Calendar

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Agenda

  1. Apr
    30
    Thu
    2015

    1. Struggle, Distortion, and Approximation: Translating the Declarations of the Perfected (Zhen’gao) – Stephen R. Bokenkamp (Arizona State University) @ HSSB 3041
      5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

      zhen'gao

      Stephen R. Bokenkamp
      (Arizona State University)

      In attempting to understand the Declarations of the Perfected (Zhen’gao), a fourth-century Chinese collection of transcripts from a Daoist medium who channeled the gods, we confront not only the normal problems of translating intimate family documents from an unfamiliar culture and distant time, but added complexities brought on by the fact that the materials that formed the basis for this text were revealed in a divine language unintelligible to mortals.

  2. May
    7
    Thu
    2015

    1. Hank Glassman – “Remembering the Dead in Medieval Japan: On the Origins of Stone Grave Markers” @ SSMS 2135
      4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
      Hank Glassman

      Hank Glassman
      (Haverford College)

      Presented by the International Shinto Foundation Endowed Chair in Shinto Studies, Japanese Religions Lectures

      About the Talk

      In the famous wars between the Genji and the Heike, Tōdaiji and other important monuments in the “old capital” of Nara were burned to the ground. Shujōbō Chōgen (1121-1206), placed in charge of the rebuilding, enlisted the help of Chinese artisans form the port city of Ningbo to come help in the reconstruction. This invitation, made at the close of the twelfth century, coincided with an increasing attention to the site of cremation and burial and the start of the custom of visiting graves or hakamairi. In this talk, I examine the identities of the continental stone carvers who came to Japan and the activities of their descendants in the second and third generation. I also take up the question of permanent grave markers and tended, maintained graves, as developed in thirteenth-century Japan.

      Download print flyer (pdf)

      Organized by the ISF Chair in Shinto Studies; co-sponsored with the Department of History of Art and Architecture.

  3. May
    8
    Fri
    2015

    1. Symposium: “War and Remembrance: Cultural Imprints of Japan’s Samurai Age.” (all-day) @ Flying A Studios Room
      May 8

      An interdisciplinary group of scholars of medieval and early modern Japanese literature, history, religion, and performing arts examine topics related to “War and Remembrance” during Japan’s years of military rule (late 12th to late 19th centuries). Exploring a range of representations and responses to war, participants examine the impacts of war on cultural memory and production.

      For the schedule, participants, and presentation abstracts, please visit: http://samuraiwarmemories.weebly.com/,
      or contact the symposium organizer,
      Dr. Katherine Saltzman-Li.

      Download print flyer (pdf)

  4. May
    11
    Mon
    2015

    1. Lecture: “The Ancestors Come Back: An Ethnographic Study of Lineage Traditions in Southern Zhejiang” @ HSSB 2212
      5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      UCSB Confucius Institute Presents a Free Lecture
      聖塔芭芭拉加州大學孔子学院講演
      by Professors FAN Lizhu & CHEN Na
      Fudan University, Shanghai

      FAN Lizhu

      FAN Lizhu 范丽珠

      This presentation is based on anthropological observations of lineage traditions in Southern Zhejiang, the birthplace of China’s private economy. Many villages have now rebuilt their ancestral halls and recompiled their genealogies. Should we think of lineages as lost cultural heritage or as a cultural renewal? The current lineage revival is not simply a return to earlier patterns, but is instead closely related to local history, to specific social ties, to local political changes and to globalization.

      FAN Lizhu 范丽珠 is Professor of Sociology at Fudan University and Managing Associate Director, Fudan – UC Center on Contemporary China at U.C. San Diego. As a pioneer sociologist of religion in China, she has engaged in historical and ethnographic studies of Chinese folk religious beliefs and sociological theories of religion.

      CHEN Na

      CHEN Na 陈纳

      CHEN Na 陈纳 is a research fellow at the Center for Social Development, Fudan University, and research associate at the School of International Relations & Pacific Studies, U.C. San Diego. His research interest includes sociology of religion, sociology of development, and intercultural communication. His recent research includes an ethnographic study of the revival of Confucianism and reconstruction of Chinese identity, and the study of clientelism as a guanxi tradition in an East China rural community.

  5. May
    14
    Thu
    2015

    1. Confucius China Studies Scholarships, Information Session 新汉学计划 @ HSSB 2212
      5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
      • Are you a graduate student in China Studies and want to go to China for research or study?
      • Are you a junior or senior undergraduate student with a leadership role at UCSB?
      • Are you a UCSB faculty member wishing to undertake joint research with top universities in China?

      Come and find out about the Confucius China Studies Scholarships offered by Hanban. These scholarships pay airfare and accommodations for study and research in China.

      Sponsored by: Confucius Institute UCSB

  6. May
    19
    Tue
    2015

    1. “ONE SUMMER”: Screening Independent Chinese Film w/ Yang Yishu @ MCC Theater
      10:30 am – 1:00 pm

      UCSB will host Yang Yishu, one of China’s most talented independent filmmakers, who will screen her award-winning feature film ONE SUMMER at the MultiCultural Center Theater from 10:30-1:30. After the screening there will be a discussion with the director about her film and independent cinema scene in China.

      After the event, Professor Yang will also speak to students in EACS 4B on “The Cultural Revolution in Chinese Film” from 2:00-3:15 at Embarcadero Hall.

      All events are free and the public is welcome to attend.

      Download event flyer (pdf)

  7. May
    21
    Thu
    2015

    1. Visiting Scholar, Andrew Rankin Discusses Yukio Mishima on Art and Evil @ SSMS2135
      5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

      Mishima Flyer (for Print)For many years after his shocking suicide in 1970 Mishima’s name was virtually taboo in Japanese intellectual circles. But his reputation in Japan has grown considerably during this century, and today there is more serious interest in his work than ever before. This talk will examine some of Mishima’s pronouncements on  the congruence of art and evil, a recurrent theme in his work, from his earliest poems and essays to his final violent outburst, which Mishima himself characterized as an act of ‘aesthetic terrorism’.

      Andrew Rankin received his Ph.D. in Japanese Studies from Cambridge University and has lived in Tokyo for many years. He is the author of Seppuku: A History of Samurai Suicide (2011) and has translated works by Mishima, Nakagami Kenji, and others.

  8. May
    26
    Tue
    2015

    1. Chinese Tea Ceremony Demonstration @ HSSB 2212
      5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      Tea CeremonySpace is limited, please sign up by email: Angela Zeng, azeng@eastasian.ucsb.edu.

      Priorities are given to Chinese, Japanese majors, Graduate students and faculty in East Asian Studies.

      Sponsored by: Confucius Institute UCSB

    2. Ōuchi Fumi: “Have I Attained Buddhahood? Mountain Asceticism in Contemporary Japan” @ SSMS 2135
      5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      Speaker

      Professor Ōuchi Fumi, Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Sendai (Japan)

      About the Talk

      Shugendō is a combinatory religious tradition in Japan centered on mountain ascetic practice that dates back to the middle ages. Despite doctrinal claims that Shugendō will result in “becoming a buddha in the present body” (sokushin jōbutsu), almost no modern practitioner expects to attain this supreme goal. Yet, as a senior practitioner of Shugendō and a researcher, I would argue that in the mountain practice, a participant does have a distinctive and extraordinary experience. This lecture aims at discussing the mechanisms by which participants gain a profound sense of accomplishment based on my ethnographical research. It will emphasize three points: 1) the importance of the theme of the purification of six sense organs to be realized physically or sensorially, 2) the crucial effects of sound and voice in the ritual process, 3) the performative power brought about by blurring the boundaries of ordinary dualisms such as life and death, human beings and divinities, male and female, and so on.

      Organized by the ISF Chair in Shinto Studies; co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, and the Department of History of Art and Architecture

      Download event flyer (pdf)

  9. May
    28
    Thu
    2015

    1. Ōuchi Fumi: “Buddhist Vocal Music (Shōmyō): History, Theory, and Practice” @ SSMS 2135
      4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

      Speaker

      Professor Ōuchi Fumi, Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Sendai (Japan)

      About the Talk

      Buddhist vocal music can to be traced back to the ancient Hindu tradition of reciting the Vedas. In Japan, Buddhist vocal music (shōmyō) developed in original ways. The most distinctive feature of shōmyō is the idea that its performance leads one to become a buddha in this present body (shōmyō jōbutsu). This idea developed with the systematization of music and aesthetic theory of shōmyō. This suggests that Buddhist vocal music was both a practice for attaining enlightenment as well as a sensory music performance adorning rituals and praising the budddhas. This lecture will investigate the formation of such dual nature of shōmyō and its ritual power through a survey of shōmyō historical and theoretical writings and analyses of its performances in modern time.

      Organized by the ISF Chair in Shinto Studies; co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, and the Department of History of Art and Architecture

      Download event flyer (pdf)