Calendar

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Agenda

  1. Feb
    19
    Thu
    2015

    1. Film Screening: “Lessons in Dissent” @ Multicultural Center Theater
      12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

      Q&A with Producer/Director: Matthew Torne

      Lessons in Dissent film screening poster

      Sponsored by: The East Asia Center, EALCS, UCSB Multicultural Center, Dept of Film and Media Studies.

  2. Feb
    27
    Fri
    2015

    1. Conference – Child’s Play: Multisensory Histories of Children and Childhood in Japan and Beyond (all-day)
      Feb 27 – Feb 28
  3. Mar
    2
    Mon
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Yuan-kang Wang, on “Taiwan and the United States” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Yuan-kang Wang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Yuan-kang Wang, Associate Professor of Sociology, Western Michigan University

      Lecture Title:

      “Taiwan and the United States”

      About the lecture

      Picture of Yuan-kang Wang

      Yuan-kang Wang will be presenting the first of his two lectures, “Taiwan and the United States,” which aims to examine Taiwan’s role in U.S. foreign policy since the onset of the Cold War. The lecture will also discuss U.S. policy toward Taiwan during the Korean War, Taiwan Strait Crises of 1954-55 and 1958, President Nixon’s rapprochement with China, Taiwan Relations Act, the policy of strategic ambiguity, Taiwan Strait Crisis of 1995-96, and U.S. arms sales.  Dr. Wang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Western Michigan University. He specializes in international relations, historical China, Taiwan security, and U.S.-China relations. His research examines the nexus between international relations theory and historical China. His book, Harmony and War: Confucian Culture and Chinese Power Politics, was published by Columbia University Press.

  4. Mar
    3
    Tue
    2015

    1. (Time changed) Burying “Nie Zheng’s Bones”: The Making of Martyrs in 1911 China, lecture by Ying Hu (UC Irvine) @ SSMS 2135
      5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

      Speaker

      Ying Hu (Associate Professor, UC Irvine)

      About the Talk

      Picture of Ying Hu

      Ying Hu

      This talk examines two cases of martyr-making, that of Qiu Jin (1875-1907), an anti-Qing revolutionary and beheaded for her involvement in armed uprising, and that of Liangbi (1877-1912), Manchu loyalist, commander of the Qing Palace Guard, whose assassination in January 1912 sealed the fate of the Empire. As canonization typically involves immediate associates, local elites and the state, the process, whether successful or not, gives us a privileged window for viewing different conceptions of virtue and community as well as divergent ways of writing history.

      Sponsors

      Organized and sponsored by the East Asia Center, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
      Co-sponsored by the Department of History & the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center.

  5. Mar
    4
    Wed
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Yuan-kang Wang, on “Taiwan and China” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Yuan-kang Wang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Yuan-kang Wang, Associate Professor of Sociology, Western Michigan University

      Lecture Title:

      “Taiwan and China”

      About the lecture

      Picture of Yuan-kang Wang

      Yuan-kang Wang will be presenting the second of his two lectures, “Taiwan and China,” which aims to look at Taiwan’s evolving relations with China. The lecture will also investigate Taiwan public opinion, the rise of Taiwanese identity, Taiwan’s economic dependence on China, people-to-people exchanges, and the issue of sovereignty. Dr. Wang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Western Michigan University. He specializes in international relations, historical China, Taiwan security, and U.S.-China relations. His research examines the nexus between international relations theory and historical China. His book, Harmony and War: Confucian Culture and Chinese Power Politics, was published by Columbia University Press.

  6. Mar
    5
    Thu
    2015

    1. Screening of HAFU, The Mixed Race Experience w/ Panel Discussion @ Multicultural Center Theater
      4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      hafu“Best Documentary” Award at the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival.

      “It is a heartfelt and deeply human effort to encourage Japan to be an openly multicultural society.”
      - Rob Schwarz, Metropolis

      pdf (icon)  Download print flyer

  7. Mar
    9
    Mon
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Eric C.C. Chang, on “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Eric Chang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Eric C.C. Chang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

      Lecture Title:

      “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements”

      About the lecture

      Picsture of Eric C.C. Chang

      Click image to visit Professor Chang’s MSU profile page in a new window.

      Eric Chang will be presenting the first of his two lectures, “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements,” which aims to explore the concepts and the measurement of corruption, to discuss the different quantitative ways to tap into corruption, ranging from subjective or perception indices to objective measurements, and to briefly evaluate the causes and the consequences of corruption in the theoretical literature.  Dr. Chang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. His research interests are political corruption, democratization, East Asian politics, political economy, political methodology. His publications were included in Inequality and Democracy (Seoul: Korea University Press, 2014), and Electoral Systems and the Balance of Consumer-Producer Power (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

  8. Mar
    11
    Wed
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Eric C.C. Chang, on “Political Corrupting in Taiwan” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Eric Chang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Eric C.C. Chang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

      Lecture Title:

      “Political Corrupting in Taiwan”

      About the lecture

      Picsture of Eric C.C. Chang

      Click image to visit Professor Chang’s MSU profile page in a new window.

      Eric Chang will be presenting the second of his two lectures, “Political Corrupting in Taiwan,” which aims to discuss the historical practice of political corruption in Taiwan. The lecture will begin by reviewing how the nationalist party’s reliance on the patron-client alliance with the local factions and their huge endowment in party assets contributed to pervasive corruption before Taiwan democratized, then discuss how the Democratic Progressive Party won the 2000 Taiwanese presidential election with a clean imagine but quickly followed the footsteps of the KMT toward corrupt politics, and hope to find out whether democratization in Taiwan, buttressed by institutionalized political competition and increased freedom of press, helps reduce levels of corruption. Dr. Chang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. His research interests are political corruption, democratization, East Asian politics, political economy, political methodology. His publications were included in Inequality and Democracy (Seoul: Korea University Press, 2014), and Electoral Systems and the Balance of Consumer-Producer Power (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

  9. Mar
    16
    Mon
    2015

    1. “From Revolutionary Ideology to Intangible Cultural Heritage:  The changing basis of legitimacy in China,” Lecture by Distinguished Professor Richard Madsen, UCSD Department of Sociology @ HSSB 4041
      1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

      MadsenProfessor Madsen is the author or co-author of twelve books on Chinese culture, American culture, and international relations. His best known works on American culture are Habits of the Heart and The Good Society. These books explore and criticize the culture of individualism and the institutions that sustain it. Habits of the Heartwon the LA Times Book Award and was jury nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

      His books on China include Democracy’s Dharma: Religious Renaissance and Political Development in TaiwanChen Village under Mao and DengMorality and Power in a Chinese Village [winner of the C. Wright Mills Award], Unofficial ChinaChina and the American DreamChina’s Catholics: Tragedy and Hope in an Emerging Civil Society, and Popular China: Unofficial Culture in a Globalizing Society.

      Books on social theory include: Meaning and Modernity, and The Many and the One: Religious and Secular Perspectives on Ethical Pluralism in the Modern World.

  10. Mar
    17
    Tue
    2015

    1. 6th International Symposium on Studies of Language Contact and the History of Chinese Syntax (all-day) @ Garden Room, The Upham Hotel
      Mar 17

      About the Conference

      Chinese has been continuously in contact with a substantial number of languages belonging to other families in past periods as well as modern times. This symposium brings linguists from France, China and the U.S. who have been working on historical Chinese syntax and language contact and change in the Chinese language. Particular focus will be given to the diachronic study of the language of Chinese Buddhist sutras translated in the Mediaeval Period (the 3rd-6th century), the Yuan baihua under Mongolian occupation during the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), and synchronic research on Northwestern Chinese dialects and/or Sinitic languages in the modern period.

      Download Chinese Symposium Flyer (pdf)

      Language

      Symposium Papers will be presented in Chinese

      Conference Organized by

      Hsiao-jung Yu
      (East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, UCSB)