Calendar

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Agenda

  1. Mar
    3
    Tue
    2015

    1. (Time changed) Burying “Nie Zheng’s Bones”: The Making of Martyrs in 1911 China, lecture by Ying Hu (UC Irvine) @ SSMS 2135
      5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

      Speaker

      Ying Hu (Associate Professor, UC Irvine)

      About the Talk

      Picture of Ying Hu

      Ying Hu

      This talk examines two cases of martyr-making, that of Qiu Jin (1875-1907), an anti-Qing revolutionary and beheaded for her involvement in armed uprising, and that of Liangbi (1877-1912), Manchu loyalist, commander of the Qing Palace Guard, whose assassination in January 1912 sealed the fate of the Empire. As canonization typically involves immediate associates, local elites and the state, the process, whether successful or not, gives us a privileged window for viewing different conceptions of virtue and community as well as divergent ways of writing history.

      Sponsors

      Organized and sponsored by the East Asia Center, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
      Co-sponsored by the Department of History & the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center.

  2. Mar
    4
    Wed
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Yuan-kang Wang, on “Taiwan and China” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Yuan-kang Wang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Yuan-kang Wang, Associate Professor of Sociology, Western Michigan University

      Lecture Title:

      “Taiwan and China”

      About the lecture

      Picture of Yuan-kang Wang

      Yuan-kang Wang will be presenting the second of his two lectures, “Taiwan and China,” which aims to look at Taiwan’s evolving relations with China. The lecture will also investigate Taiwan public opinion, the rise of Taiwanese identity, Taiwan’s economic dependence on China, people-to-people exchanges, and the issue of sovereignty. Dr. Wang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Western Michigan University. He specializes in international relations, historical China, Taiwan security, and U.S.-China relations. His research examines the nexus between international relations theory and historical China. His book, Harmony and War: Confucian Culture and Chinese Power Politics, was published by Columbia University Press.

  3. Mar
    5
    Thu
    2015

    1. Screening of HAFU, The Mixed Race Experience w/ Panel Discussion @ Multicultural Center Theater
      4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      hafu“Best Documentary” Award at the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival.

      “It is a heartfelt and deeply human effort to encourage Japan to be an openly multicultural society.”
      - Rob Schwarz, Metropolis

      pdf (icon)  Download print flyer

  4. Mar
    9
    Mon
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Eric C.C. Chang, on “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Eric Chang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Eric C.C. Chang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

      Lecture Title:

      “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements”

      About the lecture

      Picsture of Eric C.C. Chang

      Click image to visit Professor Chang’s MSU profile page in a new window.

      Eric Chang will be presenting the first of his two lectures, “Political Corruption: Concepts, Definitions, and Measurements,” which aims to explore the concepts and the measurement of corruption, to discuss the different quantitative ways to tap into corruption, ranging from subjective or perception indices to objective measurements, and to briefly evaluate the causes and the consequences of corruption in the theoretical literature.  Dr. Chang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. His research interests are political corruption, democratization, East Asian politics, political economy, political methodology. His publications were included in Inequality and Democracy (Seoul: Korea University Press, 2014), and Electoral Systems and the Balance of Consumer-Producer Power (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

  5. Mar
    11
    Wed
    2015

    1. CTS, Visiting Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Eric C.C. Chang, on “Political Corrupting in Taiwan” @ South Hall 1430
      2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

      The Center for Taiwan Studies would like to invite you to attend the talks of
      Professor Eric Chang from the Visiting Scholars Lecture Series:

      Speaker:

      Eric C.C. Chang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

      Lecture Title:

      “Political Corrupting in Taiwan”

      About the lecture

      Picsture of Eric C.C. Chang

      Click image to visit Professor Chang’s MSU profile page in a new window.

      Eric Chang will be presenting the second of his two lectures, “Political Corrupting in Taiwan,” which aims to discuss the historical practice of political corruption in Taiwan. The lecture will begin by reviewing how the nationalist party’s reliance on the patron-client alliance with the local factions and their huge endowment in party assets contributed to pervasive corruption before Taiwan democratized, then discuss how the Democratic Progressive Party won the 2000 Taiwanese presidential election with a clean imagine but quickly followed the footsteps of the KMT toward corrupt politics, and hope to find out whether democratization in Taiwan, buttressed by institutionalized political competition and increased freedom of press, helps reduce levels of corruption. Dr. Chang received his Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. His research interests are political corruption, democratization, East Asian politics, political economy, political methodology. His publications were included in Inequality and Democracy (Seoul: Korea University Press, 2014), and Electoral Systems and the Balance of Consumer-Producer Power (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

  6. Mar
    30
    Mon
    2015

    1. Chinese Language Placement Test – Spring 2015 @ HSSB 4080
      2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

      Visit the Chinese Language Program website for more information and to sign up for the test. Please fill out the sign-up sheet and send it to Chen-Chuan (Jennifer) Hsu, hsu@eastasian.ucsb.edu.

    2. Japanese Language Placement Test – Spring 2015 @ HSSB 4020
      3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

      Testing Date:

      Monday, March 30 @ 3:00PM  (HSSB 4020)

      Check out the Japanese Language Program Website for more information and to sign up for the test.

  7. Apr
    4
    Sat
    2015

    1. Test of Chinese as a Foreign Language – TOCFL @ Multiple rooms (check description)
      10:00 am – 12:00 pm

      2015 TOCFL

      TEST SITES:

      HSSB 2206 (Level 1&2), UCSB

      HSSB 2252 (Level 3&4), UCSB

      HSSB 2251 (Level 5&6), UCSB

      Registration Deadline: March 4, 2015

      2015 Registration Form (PDF)

      Mock test can be found at http://www.tw.org/tocfl

      For further questions, please contact Chen-chuan Hsu

  8. Apr
    13
    Mon
    2015

    1. Film screening “Us & Them” on Korean Indie rock music @ McCune Conference Room (HSSB 6020)
      5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

      With directors and musicians Stephen Epstein (Victoria University, New Zealand) and Tim Tangherlini (UCLA), David Novak (Music, UCSB) and others.

  9. May
    8
    Fri
    2015

    1. Symposium: “War and Remembrance: Cultural Imprints of Japan’s Samurai Age.” (all-day)
      May 8