News & Events

Announcements

 WHO: Prof. Terry Kleeman

WHEN: 5:00pm-6:30pm, Tuesday, May 30, 2017
 
WHERE: 4080 HSSB

 

WHO: Prof. Zheng Wang 
 
WHEN: 5:00pm-6:30pm, Thursday, May 18, 2017
 
WHERE: 4080 HSSB
WHO: Prof. Shanruo Ning Zhang 张善若
 
WHEN: 5:00pm-6:30pm, Tuesday, April 25, 2017
 
WHERE: 4080 HSSB

 

WHO: Prof. Dawei Cheng
 
WHEN: 3:00pm-5:00pm, Friday, February 10, 2017
 
WHERE: 2135 SSMS

http://www.global.ucsb.edu/news/event/593

Events

Daoists are often envisioned as solitary hermits practicing non-action, or arcane alchemists manipulating elixirs.  But for the first few centuries of its existence, members of the organized religion of Daoism lived in communities of fellow believers, governed by strict sets of precepts and avoiding the company of the profane. Bound together by esoteric sexual rites and sharing periodic vegetarian feasts supplied through their annual tithe of five pecks of rice, these Daoists joined together in an egalitarian society, awaiting an imminent apocalypse that would welcome in a utopian age of Great Peace.

  1. May 30, 2017 - 5:00pm
  2. May 30, 2017 - 6:30pm

Analyzing images of Chinese women over 60 years, this talk explores the erased history of socialist state feminism and shows the drastic changes in gender norms in the era of global capitalism. Given the assumption that “Maoist gender discourse” was authored by a faceless patriarchal Party state, this talk will bring feminist producers of gendered “propaganda” back into history. Changes in visual representation signify changed power relations of gender and class, as well as the changed nature of the state. The talk is based on Prof. Wang’s new book Finding Women in the State: A Socialist Feminist Revolution in the People’s Republic of China, 1949-1964 (2017).

  1. May 18, 2017 -
    5:00pm to 6:30pm

This talk examines how Confucian political culture operates in contemporary Chinese politics.  The author draws upon a wide range of data—surveys, interviews, archives, public hearings records, and Communist Party reports—to argue that China’s political culture performs functions similar to democratic political cultures, i.e., providing legitimacy for the government and enabling citizens to engage the state.  The talk also discusses how Chinese notions of morality, reciprocity (guanxi), rule of law, legitimacy of the state, and the modes citizens employ to connect with the state are all rooted in key principles of Confucian discourse. 

  1. April 25, 2017 -
    5:00pm to 6:30pm

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05/30/2017 - 17:00
 
05/30/2017 - 18:30