Iwanami Shoten releases Japanese translation of Prof. John Nathan’s memoir “Living Carelessly in Tokyo and Elsewhere”

On November 22, 2017, Iwanami Shoten (岩波書店) published 日本放浪記 (Nippon hoorooki), the Japanese translation of John Nathan’s 2008 memoir, Living Carelessly in Tokyo and Elsewhere.

From best-selling novelist Mizumura Minae’s  comment on the cover of the Japanese edition:

“This is a tale of one man’s ambition, his disappointments, and his loves, and is at the same time an invaluable chronicle of Japan’s postwar literary community. Unflaggingly fascinating!”

Praise from American critics:

“In narrating the events of his life, in its ups, downs and (predominantly) swerves, Nathan brings a talent for characterization, a splendid ability in scene setting, and an acute power of dramatizing incidents…His portrait of his stormy relationships with strong personalities, such as Mishima, Shintaro Katsu, and Sony chairman Norio Ohga are pointed and insightful, often yielding memorable moments…an enthralling read.”(Evergreen Review, 2008)

“Nathan is a practiced storyteller. “Living Carelessly” is an engaging chronicle of his passionate lifelong involvement with Japan.  It offers a vivid picture  of Japanese culture from someone who infiltrated it intimately…”Living Carelessly” is also a candid confessional portrait of a man so driven to prove his artistic talents (to himself and to others) that his achievements in several realms fail to satisfy him. Yet as this memoir makes clear, his achievements, while falling short of his dreams–whose don’t?–add up to more than he thinks.”  (Los Angeles Times Book Review, March 30, 2008).

In “Nurturing Warriors” UCSB Current Highlights Prof. Sabine Frühstück’s “Playing War”

Japan’s history of war, from the late 19thcentury to the present, shifts dramatically at the conclusion of World War II. After a series of intense conflicts, beginning with the Sino-Japanese war of 1894-95, Japan embraced peace and anti-militarism.

Despite the bifurcation of eras, says a UC Santa Barbara scholar, one aspect of Japanese culture remains unchanged: the use of children to validate war and sentimentalize peace: In “Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan” (University of California Press, 2017) Sabine Frühstück, a professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, explores the nexus of children and war in the country.

Read more on The Current

Report: International Conference on the Future of US-China Economic Relations

The International Conference on Future US-China Economic Relations is committed to improving mutual understanding of the political economy of US-China relations. The intention is to provide a platform for academic exchanges between scholars from China and the United States. China has become a major influence on world economic growth. As China is now moving into a new more normal phase of economic development, its economic slowdown is having much bigger policy implications and global impacts than expected. Renminbi (RMB) internationalization has been a focal point in recent years. The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), One-Belt-One-Road, G20, and Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) have also brought attention to US-China economic diplomacy.

This conference intends to bring together leading scholars from China and the United States, representing a wide range of research programs, to exchange ideas on the study of current issues in US-China economic relations. Particular emphasis will be placed on the political economy of trade and financial relations as well as regional and global issues. We will also welcome perspectives from International Relations that shed light on US-China economic diplomacy.